publishedabout 2 months ago
5 min read

"What the devil is the point of surviving, going on living, when it’s a drag? But you see, that’s what people do.”
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– Alan Watts

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Hey there creator,

On the surface I know the above quote isn't the most inspiring β€” it might even sound a bit grim.

But stick with me for a second.

I think one of the hardest things to balance throughout our day-to-day lives is maintaining joy and fun while we take on the "serious" tasks of the day like our work for instance.

Maintaining an attitude of fun, playfulness, and curiosity while we still are sincerely engaged and committed to the task at hand.

This is about understanding the difference between being serious and being sincere.

Philosopher Alan Watts talked about this critical difference as a way for humans to "wake up" to how we play the game of life.

To illustrate this difference, think of a time when you were playing a game with others, maybe it was a board game like Monopoly...

And either you or someone else was being extremely serious and lost complete sight that they are simply playing a game.

They might have been hyper-focused on the minutia of the game, not conversing, strictly policing the rules, all while barely cracking a smile.

We all know what it's like to play a game with someone like this.

It's not fun. The energy becomes stagnant, maybe uncomfortable, and like Alan Watts says "it becomes a drag".

Being serious is the quickest way to obliterate the playfulness from any "game".

And this applies throughout our lives. We can substitute "game" with countless other things like our work, projects, exercise, walking the dog, meditation, cooking dinner, or even something trivial like doing the dishes.

Now, on the flip side, back to the game analogy, consider the person who always maintains a clear perspective that they're simply playing a game β€” yet they choose to play it with full gusto while having so much fun.

Now, that's SINCERE.

This person can recognize and balance the duality of the moment. They are fully committed to playing the game yet lively and light.

They throw themselves fully into the present moment β€” yet never lose awareness of the moment's context.

We find this person to be so much fun to play with.

The key idea in all of this is PLAY β€” which when applied to how we go about our lives is about:

  • Experiencing life with a light-hearted and PLAYFUL awareness.
  • Showing up for life with a SINCERE intention to give your best at everything you do while not taking it so seriously.

This is the state of being I set the intention to take on every morning.

Playing "the game" (or insert any aspect of life) wholeheartedly, with so much passion and enthusiasm while never forgetting it's all just a game.

I believe it's in the spirit of combining sincerity with playfulness in which we all aspire to live our lives...

It's what I like to call, waking up every day feeling radiantly alive... energized to do whatever it is we do throughout the day...

While maintaining the perspective that all the things that we take on (work, projects, goals, etc.) in our life are just elements of the "game"...

Not the source of our happiness and fulfillment but rather a mere outlet for it.

And if throughout the day I find that life is "becoming a drag", it's usually because I've gone unconscious by switching from being sincere to being serious in whatever I am doing.

It means I fell out of the state of sincere playfulness.

It means I've lost perspective of the "game" I'm currently playing and along with it vanished any sense of ease, playfulness, and light-heartedness.

So, how do I get myself back to sincerity?

I try to remind myself that I've slipped into that overly serious person playing Monopoly who is being heavy, rigid, and seemingly isn't having fun.

And even if I'm "winning in the game", I lost complete perspective.

Because after all, what's the point of winning at a game in which no one is having fun playing including yourself?

Remember, always sincere.

Never serious.


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5 Ways to Deal with Anxiety at Work πŸ§‘πŸ½β€πŸ’Ό

  1. Call time-out​
    Taking a break may seem like an obvious strategy, but many people tend to deal with anxiety at work by powering through and trying to get as much as possible done to alleviate their stress. Stepping away can be a great way to reduce your anxiety. Set reminders to take mindful breaks even for just 5 minutes throughout the day.
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  2. Talk to a trusted colleague​
    Anxiety can lead to lots of repetitive thinking about the causes, factors, and consequences of the unpleasant state of emotion you are in. Talking to someone can break that loop by getting new ideas and insights to help you create new ways of thinking about the situation. And at the very least talking to someone will give you that mindful break mentioned in #1.
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  3. Move your body​
    There’s countless research showing the positive impact physical exercise has on our mental health in general, and in particular on anxiety. If you don't start your day by exercising, give it a try and notice if you feel more at ease during the day. Also, just by simply getting your body moving during the workday can help ease any anxiety. When I used to work in a corporate office, I would try to go for a 10-15 minute walk during my lunch break.
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  4. Reduce your caffeine intake​
    Drinking too much coffee can produce the same exact effects as anxiety, to the point where researchers have been unable to distinguish anxiety from caffeinism with complete certainty in studies. And if you’re already feeling stressed, caffeine can intensify the anxiety. Try decaffeinated teas with soothing infusions like ginger and turmeric. Also, keep in mind, the latest research shows that your last caffeinated drink of the day should be at least 8 hours before you go to sleep to avoid it affecting your quality of rest.
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  5. Get mindful ​
    This can be as simple as taking a few deep breaths, but If you don’t have some form of mindfulness practice it’s worth getting one immediately. Meditation and yoga are just one of many mindfulness practices. Mindfulness is any tool or practice that helps you extend the gap between stimulus and response.

// Interesting Finds :: 🎲

External Solutions for Internal Problems Don't Exist

I saw this referenced in a series of retweets that we were referencing a tweet from user @thisisdebonair​

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It's one of those things we all know on a cognitive level (and heard a zillion times) but it's always good to be reminded of.

​The "Great Dream" Model of Happiness​

This framework was developed by positive psychology practitioner, Dr. Vanessa King, along with the non-profit group Action for Happiness and it offers ten simple keys to happier living.

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// Some Soul-Stirring Goodies ::✨

​The Soul Calling Series - Online Event​

This series contains three videos and a LIVE webinar tomorrow, in which author and expert intuitive Rebecca Campbell explores how we can use our intuition to form a deeper connection with ourselves and align with what truly lights us up.

​A Past Live Quiz​

Did you live in Atlantis? Avalon? Lemuria?

That question might not mean anything to you, but Rebecca created this fun quiz that lets you discover where your soul has spent a past life and better understand where it’s leading you next.


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Thanks for reading.
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As Always, Keep Creating,

avl

Anthony V. Lombardo

https://anthonyvlombardo.com
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